The Photographers on Photography

Chances are if you walked past a National Geographic photographer on the street, you wouldn’t know it—and that’s how they like it. As photographer and Editor at Large Michael “Nick” Nichols puts it, “I want people to remember the pictures, not my name or what I look like.” But as part of our 125th anniversary special issue this October, we wanted to turn the camera around on Nick and his fellow photographers.

The photographers of National Geographic magazine come from all walks of life. Their insights about the world are built over lifetimes devoted to documenting the lives of others. Their pictures are proof of their passion. But beyond the photographs, so many of these photographers are my heroes. They are our friends, our colleagues, our community. And with these upcoming videos, we want to share with you why.

This video portrait series is a labor of love. It involved sitting down with 44 photographers coming through headquarters this year to talk with me about how they found photography, and why they never left. From my interviewer’s chair, it felt like traveling to endless worlds without ever moving an inch. These were not your typical interviews; they were shoptalk conversations that didn’t seem to start or end in that room. We recently premiered this first installment, comprised of excerpts, at the international photography festival Visa Pour l’Image in Perpignan, France. Consider this a sneak peek of each resulting individual video portrait that is to come.

More here: http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/15/the-photographers-on-photography/

Hugh Holland

The shorts were… well… short, the pads were shit, the hair was long, the deck was thin, the socks were high, the kick was invisible, the ollie was but a dream and the skating was pure. Free from a multi-billion dollar industry and free from fame seeking egos, the mid seventies represent the adolesence of the skateboarding movement. A time where empty pools were the ultimate haven and skaters nurtured the idea of being vertical. It was such an amazing period… everything was new.

Although not a skater himself Oklahoma photographer Hugh Holland as an observer was captivated by skateboarding. He soon befriended the boys from the Santa Monica and Venice skateboarding scene (including the legendary Z-boys) and drove the boys from skate spot to skate spot documenting the beginning of what modern skateboarding has become. His photos were shot  mostly in the late afternoon with old negative movie film giving his images a warm and soft tone. Awesome work.

Source:
buy generic antabuse http://www.lifelounge.com.au/photography/news/hugh-holland.aspx

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Marty Knapp – Portrait of a Photographer

This short profile film on Marty Knapp is a personal project. Marty has been photographing the landscapes of Northern California and the surrounding areas near Point Reyes for over 25 years. His work portrays the coastal wilderness area in the classic manner of the great American landscape photographer.

martyknapp.com

Director: Logan Kelsey
verticalonline.com

Camera: RED Scarlet-X
Editing: Final Cut Pro X
Film Stock Emulator: FilmConvert

Music composed and scored by: Dexter Britain
dexterbritain.co.uk

Source: Vimeo

Eve Arnold

Eve Arnold was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Russian immigrant parents. She began photographing in 1946, while working at a photo-finishing plant in New York City, and then studied photography in 1948 with Alexei Brodovitch at the New School for Social Research in New York.

Arnold first became associated with Magnum Photos in 1951, and became a full member in 1957. She was based in the US during the 1950s but went to England in 1962 to put her son through school; except for a six-year interval when she worked in the US and China, she lived in the UK for the rest of her life.

Her time in China led to her first major solo exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum in 1980, where she showed the resulting images. In the same year, she received the National Book Award for In China and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society of Magazine Photographers.

“If a photographer cares about the people before the lens and is compassionate, much is given. It is the photographer, not the camera, that is the instrument.

In later years she received many other honours and awards. In 1995 she was made fellow of the Royal Photographic Society and elected Master Photographer – the world’s most prestigious photographic honour – by New York’s International Center of Photography. In 1996 she received the Kraszna-Krausz Book Award for In Retrospect, and the following year she was granted honorary degrees by the University of St Andrews, Staffordshire University, and the American International University in London; she was also appointed to the advisory committee of the National Museum of Photography, Film & Television in Bradford, UK. She has had twelve books published.

Eve passed away in January of 2012.

Source:
http://www.magnumphotos.com/C.aspx?VP3=CMS3&VF=MAGO31_9_VForm&ERID=24KL53ZGM6

A little celebration of her work:

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